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Technical Writer

Technical writers turn complex, technical information into clear and simple language that is easy for either tech professionals or the general public to understand. They compose a variety of documents, such as software manuals, training manuals, assembly instructions, online customer service guides and technical reports. Technical writers often specialise in one field, such as software reporting or medical writing.

If you are interested in a career as a technical writer, visit Qualifax (www.qualifax.ie) to search for relevant courses at all levels and entry points.

Some alternative titles for this role

  • Technical Author
  • Technical Communicator

What the job involves

  • Write, edit and proofread texts
  • Collate and verify information
  • Create and edit pictures and diagrams
  • Liaise with printers, photographers and translators
  • Produce indices and catalogues

How your career can develop

With the rapid pace of progress in technology, medical and scientific advancements and the need for professionals to translate specialised data for non-professionals, prospects are bright for dedicated technical writers. Many opt for self-employment and build their own business.

Why it matters?

Everything from a four page user manual for a calculator, to a 900 page document for a new computer, relies on the work of technical writers. 

Skills

  • Must be proficient in publishing software and programmes
  • Ability to handle large amounts of complex data 
  • A sharp eye for detail
  • Research skills
  • Ability to work to strict deadlines
  • Technical or scientific educational background
  • Accuracy and attention to detail

Typical employers

  • Telecommunications companies
  • Engineering companies
  • Computer hardware and software companies
  • Technical publishers
  • The civil service, Department of Defence and local authorities

Typical salary

  • Graduate/Starting      €30,000
  • Senior/Potential        €55,000

Typical qualifications

Entry is open to all degree disciplines, but some employers may prefer degrees in scientific, technical, engineering or computing disciplines.

Alternative routes to a bachelor’s degree in this area may apply to students that have a PLC qualification in a related course or general computing/IT certification or diploma. For further details on eligibility requirements for third level entry following a PLC qualification, students should visit the CAO course search at Careersportal.ie.

Further information